Tag Archives: David Warner

The Best Picture Project — Titanic (1997)

The film poster shows a man and a woman hugging over a picture of the Titanic's bow. In the background is a partly cloudy sky and at the top are the names of the two lead actors. The middle has the film's name and tagline, and the bottom contains a list of the director's previous works, as well as the film's credits, rating, and release date.Directed by James Cameron

Screenplay by James Cameron

Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane, David Warner, Kathy Bates, Frances Fisher, Bill Paxton and Gloria Stuart

I saw Titanic in it’s first weekend in release, on Christmas Day 1997.  I distinctly remember this because I’d never seen a movie theater lobby so overrun with people before, nor had I ever been forced to sit in the third row from the front on the leftmost aisle before.  Spending three-plus hours leaning back and craning my neck to the right was hardly the ideal way to see the film and yet, it did not stop me from recognizing this was a seminal moment for me in film.[1]

And surely, given how it was such a cultural phenomenon, I’m not the only one who was captivated by Titanic[2].  In fact, it’s fair to say the whole world was captivated by it[3]  , given it was the first film to do more than $2 billion at the global box office[4]. Continue reading

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The Best Picture Project – Tom Jones (1963)

Dir. Tony Richardson

Starring Albert Finney, Hugh Griffith, Susannah York, Edith Evans and David Warner

Screenplay by John Osborne, based on Henry Fielding’s novel of the same name

In the history of the academy awards, Tom Jones as Best Picture winner seems a major anomaly because it might be the most subversive of Best Pictures ever – bearing in mind that subversion and the Academy Awards are relative things.  Nevertheless, given some of its darker and lustier themes, and their presentation in a jaunty, shiny package, it’s still a subversive film, if not as much as it otherwise could have been. Continue reading

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