The Best Picture Project – Rankings

So, as you know, I’m doing the Best Picture Project, where I watch all 88 Oscar winners for best picture and honestly, life just isn’t fun without rankings, so follows are my rankings of the Best Picture winners, from 1 to 76, complete with links to all previous posts, with 10 being shuttled over into their own special circle of hell, The Bottom Ten.  Two others were unranked, for reasons apparent in their initial reviews.

Best Picture Rankings

  1. Schindler’s List
  2. Rebecca
  3. Gone With The Wind
  4. The Bridge on the River Kwai
  5. Annie Hall
  6. Unforgiven
  7. 12 Years A Slave
  8. No Country For Old Men
  9. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
  10. American Beauty
  11. Amadeus
  12. The Hurt Locker
  13. Argo
  14. Mutiny on the Bounty
  15. The Godfather
  16. Titanic
  17. Slumdog Millionaire
  18. The Silence of the Lambs
  19. The French Connection
  20. Spotlight
  21. Chicago
  22. Casablanca
  23. In The Heat of the Nightt
  24. Midnight Cowboy
  25. The King’s Speech
  26. Shakespeare in Love
  27. On The Waterfront
  28. Kramer vs. Kramer
  29. Dances With Wolves
  30. The Apartment
  31. The Sound of Music
  32. Lawrence of Arabia
  33. The Godfather Part II
  34. Tom Jones
  35. The Departed
  36. Driving Miss Daisy
  37. Rain Man
  38. The Lost Weekend
  39. Birdman
  40. Hamlet
  41. Patton
  42. The Deer Hunter
  43. A Man For All Seasons
  44. It Happened One Night
  45. Marty
  46. Crash
  47. My Fair Lady
  48. West Side Story
  49. Going My Way
  50. Chariots of Fire
  51. A Beautiful Mind
  52. From Here to Eternity
  53. Gentleman’s Agreement
  54. Forrest Gump
  55. Ordinary People
  56. Platoon
  57. The Last Emperor
  58. You Can’t Take It With You
  59. All About Eve
  60. All The King’s Men
  61. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  62. The Life of Emile Zola
  63. Out of Africa
  64. Gladiator
  65. Oliver!
  66. Around The World in 80 Days
  67. Rocky
  68. Cimarron
  69. Terms of Endearment
  70. Mrs. Miniver
  71. Gandhi
  72. Ben-Hur
  73. All Quiet on The Western Front
  74. How Green Was My Valley
  75. The Best Years of Our Lives
  76. The Sting

Bottom Ten (#1 being worst)

  1. Million Dollar Baby
  2. Cavalcade
  3. Broadway Melody
  4. An American in Paris
  5. Gigi
  6. Grand Hotel
  7. The Great Ziegfeld
  8. Braveheart
  9. The English Patient
  10. The Greatest Show On Earth


  1. The Artist
  2. Wings

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The Best Picture Project — Cimarron (1931)

Cimarron (1931 film) poster.jpgDirected by Wesley Ruggles

Screenplay by Howard Estabrook, based upon the novel by Edna Ferber

Starring Richard Dix and Irene Dunne

Here we are friends – after these many, long years together, with you diligently consuming every entry of The Best Picture Project, and me, less-diligently, producing them, we’ve reached the end of the road, where it all comes to an end.  And coming here almost feels bittersweet, like somebody should cue Simon and Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water, or Boyz II Men’s End of the Road, to play us out.  And don’t worry about neither being appropriate for this occasion, because they’re hardly appropriate for the other occasion for which they are most associated – high school graduations.   If they work there, why not here?

But I digress. Continue reading

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The Best Picture Project – Million Dollar Baby (2004)

Million Dollar Baby poster.jpgDirected by Clint Eastwood

Screenplay by Paul Haggis, based on the stories of F.X. Toole

Starring Hillary Swank, Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Jay Baruchel, Anthony Mackie, Michael Pena and Margo Martindale

Well, here we are – the penultimate entry of the Best Picture Project.  After six years of toil and misery,[1] there is but one After Cimarron?  There will be no more, forever.[2]  But that, is for another day.  On this day I bring you the entry I’d been putting off longer than the rest – Million Dollar BabyConsciously putting off longer than the rest.  And the delay?  Imposed not because I was saving it for myself, like a delicious dessert.  No, it was put off because I did not want to see it again.  Not now, not ever, and, as I put it off, I sort-of hoped I might die before I had to get to it and, in death, I’d be spared the discomfort of it.  But, given I’m only 40 and in very good health, death did not save me.  And that, dear reader, is a lesson – death is its most-cruel when we want it, but are denied.


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The Also-Rans Project – Room (Best Picture Nominee 2015)

Room Poster.jpgDirected by Lenny Abrahamson

Written by Emma Donoghue, based on her novel

Starring Brie Larson, Jacob Tremblay, Joan Allen, William H. Macy, Tom McCamus and Sean Bridgers

Best Picture 2015 was the first year in which The Best Picture Project and The Also-Rans overlapped – probably because The Also-Rans didn’t exist before.  This meant 2015 was the first – and likely only – year in which I could alter in real-time what movies I was going to see with respect to that year’s Best Picture contest.  Generally, try to catch all the Best Picture nominees in theaters, and because this was the first year I knew I was going to be doing The Also-Rans, I had the chance to hold out on seeing one, or more, of the nominees for the express purpose of watching that film later for The Also-Rans.  The movie I withheld?  Room. Continue reading

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The Also Rans — The Adventures of Robin Hood (Best Picture Nominee 1938)

Robin hood movieposter.jpgDirected by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley

Screenplay by Norman Reilly Raine, Seton I. Miller and Rowland Leigh

Starring Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Basil Rathone, Claude Rains, Alan Hale Sr., and Melville Cooper

Everybody knows the story of Robin Hood, or at least the one-sentence tag they think is the story of Robin Hood – steal from the rich and give to the poor.  Not surprising, that tag is overly-reductive, and grabs one line from the movie in an effort to summarize it, almost at random, ignoring that Robin Hood is complicated and less-interested in stealing from the rich and giving to the poor, than he is about protesting tax policy, and religious and ethnic persecution.

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The Also Rans – The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming (Best Picture Nominee 1966)

Russians are coming.jpgDirected by Norman Jewison

Screenplay by William Rose, based upon the novel by Nathaniel Benchley

Starring Carl Reiner, Eva Marie Saint, Alan Arkin, Brian Keith, Jonathan Winters, Paul Ford and Theodore Bikel

The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming might’ve been nominated for Best Picture – and Best Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay, and a couple others – but it had zero chance of winning.  And by zero, I mean zero.  There’s always one or two of those kind of films in any Best Picture race and in 1966 The Russians are Coming was it.

One reason was history: Since the beginning, only six comedies have won the Oscar for Best Picture.  Ironically, at the time Russians came out, it would’ve had a better chance than it does today, because at that time five comedies had won Best Picture.  In the fifty years since, just one.  In a very real way its zero chance of winning in 1966 has steadily fallen below zero since. Continue reading

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The Also-Rans — Atonement (Best Picture Nominee 2007)

Atonement UK poster.jpgDirected by Joe Wright

Screenplay By Christopher Hampton, based upon the novel by Ian McEwan

Starring James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, Saoirse Ronan, Benedict Cumberbatch and Juno Temple Continue reading

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The Best Picture Project — The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King.jpgDirected by Peter Jackson

Screenplay by Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh and Phillipa Boyens, from the novel by J.R.R. Tolkein

Starring Viggo Mortenson, Elijah Wood, Sean Astin, Orlando Bloom, John Rhys-Davies, Dominic Monahan, Billy Boyd, Liv Tyler, Cate Blanchett, Bernard Hill, Hugo Weaving, Miranda Otto and Andy Serkis

In the six years I’ve been running this Project, I’ve never began with any sort of disclaimer, mostly because I’ve had nothing to disclaim.  Today, that ends:

Given The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (TLOTR:TROTK) is the third in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy, it kind of makes sense that, rather than watching TLOTR:TROTK on its own, it should be seen only as part of the whole.  In other words, watching the final 1/3 of the trilogy, without taking on the first 2/3, renders any assessment of the film a bit suspect.  But, while that might make sense I have three points to make that also make perfect sense: Continue reading

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The Best Picture Project — Schindler’s List (1993)

Schindler's List movie.jpg

Directed by Steven Spielberg

Screenplan by Steve Zailian, based upon the novel by Thomas Kennealy

Starring Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley and Ralph Fiennes

I’ll say it: Schindler’s List might be the most important film ever to win Best Picture.  It represents a true cinematic achievement and, even if it was not revolutionary in the sense that Jaws was revolutionary, it full demonstrates how you can take a deadly subject matter and, by using all the tricks of the trade, can produce an important film about a tough subject without making it fee didactic.

That all being said – this is not a film you sit down to enjoy.  There truly is no enjoyment here.   It’s a tough film on a tough topic and there’s no enjoying that.  That being said, it’s not punishing either, nor is it a chore to watch.  Rather, it’s emotionally cathartic and the sort of thing you’ll put on only when you want to have your guts ripped open.

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The Best Picture Project — The Godfather Part II (1974)

Godfather part ii.jpgDirected by Francis Ford Coppola

Screenplay by Francis Ford Coppola and Mario Puzo, based upon the novel by Mario Puzo

Starring Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire, John Cazale, Bruno Kirby, Lee Strassburg, Robert Duval, G. D. Spradlin and Harry Dean Stanton

It strikes me now that as I’ve come to the homestretch on the Best Picture Project, and looking to start my final kick,[1] I’m facing down what might be the toughest stretch of movies, having inadvertently saved some of the longest, and some of those I’d been dreading most, for last.  The streak started a few movies back with Crash (dreading), continued to The Departed (long), then on to My Fair Lady (long), leading right up to this one (long).  To come, Schindler’s List (dreading for emotional reasons and my discomfort at feeling feelings), Return of the King (massive length), Cimarron (saved for basically being unavailable), and Million Dollar Baby (dread because when I saw it in the theater, the bait-and-switch made me downright hostile with it).  Continue reading

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